This list is for you if…

  • You don't have enough top-of-funnel engineering candidates
  • You want to pursue channels with higher quality candidates
  • You'd like channels where you can attract engineers rather than chasing them
  • You want to hire engineers from under-represented groups in technology

I leave it to you to figure out how to source from each of these channels. I've sorted to the top the channels for which I am comfortable sharing my conversion rates with you.

Massive list of all hiring channels

  • Cold emails to engineers (50% reply-rate and 17% interested in a call is achievable with a well-written email)
  • Email newsletters – for example js weekly, node weekly, ruby weekly, and so on for your whole stack (2% click through rate is achievable with a well-written ad)
  • HN who's hiring monthly (#5 post with 30 applicants/month is achievable with a well-written post)
  • Airbnb
  • Angellist – A-list
  • Bootcamp grads
  • California layoffs notifications
  • Conference tours (keynote or give a talk)
  • Conferences – lanyrd: speakers, attendees, sponsors can email attendees
  • Contest for e.g. 1 set of free conference tickets to Velocity for example (very expensive but cool!); and 1 set of free tickets for under-represented group in tech. Also worth including: housing, for example on a not creepy teammate's couch.
  • Couchsurfing
  • Coursera grads
  • Craigslist
  • Events: print index cards with the short blurb of your open positions and give them to your team to put up in the women's/gender-neutral/men's bathroom stalls and urinals. Give them tape.
  • Facebook graph search for CS grads who are friends of friends
  • Facebook groups for your area: hackathon groups, new to the bay area, new grad $gradyear, breaking into tech, job searching, technical interviews
  • For yourself and each teammate…
    • Facebook friends
    • Github/BitBucket: contributors to your OSS repos
    • Github/BitBucket: issue-openers on your OSS repos
    • Github/BitBucket: star-ers of your OSS repos
    • Google contacts
    • Twitter lead cards
    • Twitter: your followers; people you follow; people they follow; people who follow your competitors; people your competitors follow.
    • University alumni facebook groups; email lists; in-person events
    • University professors who recommend you their top students
    • University recruiting: resume reviews; give tech talks; give unofficial tech talks; visit unofficially
    • University student group email lists; official paid recruiting programs; facebook groups; etc
    • University hackathons
  • Games: advertising inside of various games, ideally with >50% ratio of women via Willem Wijnans
  • Github/BitBucket: OSS contribs to OSS projects you admire
  • Github/BitBucket: people who open issues on OSS projects you admire
  • Github/BitBucket: people who star OSS projects you admire
  • Goodreads/Amazon: friends of people who've reviewed eng books
  • Goodreads/Amazon: people who've reviewed engineering books
  • Google Plus
  • Hackathons: attending them, contacting past winners
  • HackerRank.com, LeetCode.com, Interviewing.io, projecteuler.net
  • Hired
  • HN articles about your stack + interesting eng decisions - authors, commenters
  • HN who's searching for a job
  • Instagram: hashtags, geotags
  • IRC
  • Linkedin: traditional searches (ew); email your friends who you'd want to work with again; email friends who know many of your target type of engineer and ask for intros. I made a tool to help you do this, email me about it, I'll run it for you for free :) (david [åt] dtrejo dot com)
  • Livecoding on Twitch, liveedu.tv, YouTube,
  • Meetups:
    • meetup.com;
    • artisanal meetup websites
    • your own meetups (e.g. start organizing your city's offline first meetup)
    • arrive prepared: know roughly who you want to talk to
  • Medium articles about your technologies - authors, commenters
  • Medium articles exposing bad workplaces - authors, commenters
  • Product Hunt – product creators who don't seem to have solid business models
  • Quora answerers for technologies in your stack
  • Reddit – people who share their absurdly low salary and impressive achievements
  • Reddit r/programming and every other relevant r/ -> Post engineering articles with CTA (call to action).
  • Reddit, monthly who's hiring for each language you use (e.g. r/C_Programming)
  • Referrals: Searchlight meetings aka sourcing sessions (used at Stripe, Dropbox, and more. via Ivan Kirigin list ways to get them, link to searchlight instructions
  • Retargeted ads using emails you've found elsewhere (discount by # of people who run ad-blockers)
  • Skype search
  • Skype search (via Atallah)
  • Slack groups that are public: hamsterpad, slacklist, chitchats
  • Snapchat
  • Spotify: spell your message with songs via Willem Wijnans
  • StackExchange Data Explorer via Willem Wijnans
  • Stackoverflow answerers for technologies in your stack
  • Startups in general because they underpay their engineers and give out equity that is more illiquid than typical
  • Startups who haven't publicly raised in the last year
  • Strava
  • Trust Velocity via Philip Morgan
    • Mainstream press
    • Media interview
    • Podcast guesting (combined with great CTA)
    • Single guest post on major publication
    • Lead magnet on trusted 3rd party website
    • Regularly showing up in prospect's email inbox with relevant content
    • "Lumpy Envelope" campaign (e.g. how Matasano gives books to candidates who aren't experienced enough yet)
    • Job aid, calculator
  • Udemy grads (https://www.udacity.com/hire-talent) - free to hire
  • Vimeo – speakers, commenters
  • Volunteering events – e.g. teaching kids to code
  • WiFi SSID via Willem Wijnans
  • Write a book for engineers (personal experience: works great)
  • Youtube – speakers, maybe commenters

What would make this list more useful for you? Email me: david [åt] dtrejo dot com.

May engineers be with you,
David