$1100 clock made with jQuery

The QlockTwo, made in Germany, is a beautiful device.

I set out to steal some of that beauty and made a version of the QlockTwo using jQuery. You can see it live right here.

Building this clock was a ton of fun. It took me a couple of days, and I learned about the relativity of time (ooh sophisticated).

Here are some fancy psychological things that go on when you use the clock:

The first half of the hour creeps along — you don't notice the dots as much as the words, so most of the time it's later than what you see in words. The only way to stay accurate is to pay lots of attention to the dots, which requires more thought and means it takes you longer to read the clock.

The second half of the hour races. The words are always either in synced with or ahead of the real-time. This means it that you'll finish meetings earlier, and be more punctual because you'll give yourself extra time to get places. Just make sure you always schedule your appointments on the hour.

Technical Details

I select the words to be highlighted in a really janky way. It is very dependent on the structure of the table (yeah I tried to use divs, but I don't have the skill to keep all the words aligned horizontally and vertically and keep everything square too). Here's roughly how the code works:

Conclusion

 jQuery is tons of fun to work with, and the #jquery channel is full of helpful people. I emailed QlockTwo and apparently my version is a "Nice Application with JQuery and CSS!"

The time distorting aspects of the clock are quite fun, so make sure to put one up in your office so you can wrap up boring meetings more quickly.

Cheers,
David

 

David Trejo

Growth Engineer at Credit Karma & consultant. Past clients include Aconex, Triplebyte, Neo, Brown Computer Science Department, Voxer, Cloudera, and the Veteran's Benefits Administration.

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